Vote History

April 2014 Vote History

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Washington, April 1, 2014 | comments

(149) - HR 4152: Ukraine Aid and Russian Sanctions - Motion to Concur 
April 01, 2014 - Royce, R-Calif., motion to suspend the rules and concur in Senate amendments to the bill that would authorize loan guarantees and economic assistance to Ukraine, and impose sanctions on Russian and ex-Ukrainian officials. It would make unobligated State Department funds available for loan guarantees and authorize $150 million for direct aid, including $50 million for technical and civil society assistance initiatives in Ukraine, such as free and fair elections. It would authorize the president to impose visa restrictions or block the assets of any person, including Russian government officials or their close associates, determined to be responsible for the crisis in Ukraine. It also would require the Defense Department to issue an annual report on Russian military capabilities beginning on June 1, 2015, and then on June 1 each year through 2020.
Motion agreed to 378-34: R 190-32; D 188-2; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


(150) - S 2183: U.S. Broadcasts in Ukraine - Passage 
April 01, 2014 - Royce, R-Calif., motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill that would authorize up to $10 million for U.S. international broadcasting in Ukraine and the surrounding region and direct U.S. broadcasting entities to increase their presence in eastern Ukraine, including Crimea.
Motion agreed to 399-12: R 211-10; D 188-2; I 0-0.

 

 

Vote: Yea


 (151) - : Procedural Motion - Journal 
April 01, 2014 - Approval of the House Journal of Friday, March 28, 2014.
Approved 261-140: R 134-85; D 127-55; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


(152) - HR 2575: Health Care Law Employer Mandate - Previous Question 
April 02, 2014 - Burgess, R-Texas, motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and the possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 530) that would provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would change the definition of a full-time employee under the 2010 health care law's employer mandate, which requires companies to offer health coverage to their employees or pay a tax penalty.
Motion agreed to 229-194: R 229-0; D 0-194; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (153) - HR 2575: Health Care Law Employer Mandate - Rule 
April 02, 2014 - Adoption of the rule (H Res 530) that would provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would change the definition of a full-time employee under the 2010 health care law's employer mandate, which requires companies to offer health coverage to their employees or pay a tax penalty.
Adopted 236-186: R 229-0; D 7-186; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (154) - : Procedural Motion - Journal 
April 02, 2014 - Approval of the House Journal of Tuesday, April 1, 2014.
Approved 262-157: R 146-83; D 116-74; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (155) - HR 2575: Health Care Law Employer Mandate - Recommit 
April 03, 2014 - Takano, D-Calif., motion to recommit the bill to the House Ways and Means Committee and report it back immediately with an amendment that would stipulate that the bill would not take effect if it results in lower wages, fewer working hours or an increase in the federal deficit. It also would prohibit employers from reducing or eliminating health coverage benefits, increasing premiums or out-of-pocket costs or discriminating against women in health insurance coverage. It also would exempt veterans and their families from the bill.
Motion rejected 191-232: R 0-228; D 191-4; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


(156) - HR 2575: Health Care Law Employer Mandate - Passage 
April 03, 2014 - Passage of the bill that would change the definition of a full-time employee from the current 30 hours per week to 40 hours per week for purposes of the 2010 health care law's employer mandate. It also would change how the 50-employee threshold is calculated, by requiring employers to divide the aggregate number of hours worked in a month by part-time workers by 174, rather than 120 as required by current law.
Passed 248-179: R 230-0; D 18-179; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (157) - HR 1872, HR1871, HR1874: Federal Budget Process - Previous Question 
April 04, 2014 - Woodall, R-Ga., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and the possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 539) that would provide for House floor consideration of the bill (HR 1874) that would direct the Congressional Budget Office to supplement its cost estimates of major pieces of legislation with macroeconomic impact analyses. It also would provide for House floor consideration of a measure (HR 1871) that would eliminate the baseline assumption in existing budget law that discretionary spending grows each year with inflation and legislation (HR 1872) that would account for the costs of market risks in federal credit programs.
Motion agreed to 222-193: R 222-0; D 0-193; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


(158) - HR 1872, HR1871, HR1874: Federal Budget Process - Rule 
April 04, 2014 - Adoption of the rule (H Res 539) that would provide for House floor consideration of the bill (HR 1874) that would direct the Congressional Budget Office to supplement its cost estimates of major pieces of legislation with macroeconomic impact analyses. It also would provide for House floor consideration of a measure (HR 1871) that would eliminate the baseline assumption in existing budget law that discretionary spending grows each year with inflation and legislation (HR 1872) that would account for the costs of market risks in federal credit programs.
Adopted 220-194: R 220-0; D 0-194; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (159) - HR 1874: CBO Macroeconomic Analysis - Appropriations Bills Scoring 
April 04, 2014 - Connolly, D-Va., amendment that would require a supplemental macroeconomic impact analysis, or "dynamic scoring," of appropriations bills and change the threshold to trigger such scoring to $1 billion.
Rejected in Committee of the Whole 182-214: R 6-209; D 176-5; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


(160) - HR 1874: CBO Macroeconomic Analysis - State and Local Impact 
April 04, 2014 - Israel, D-N.Y., amendment that would require the Congressional Budget Office to include the impact on state and local governments in its supplemental macroeconomic impact analyses of major legislation, defined as bills that have a gross budgetary impact estimated to be greater than 0.25 percent of projected gross domestic product.
Rejected in Committee of the Whole 189-211: R 8-209; D 181-2; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


(161) - HR 1874: CBO Macroeconomic Analysis - Jobs Impact 
April 04, 2014 - Cicilline, D-R.I., amendment that would require the Congressional Budget Office to include jobs impact statements in its supplemental macroeconomic impact analyses of major legislation, defined as bills that have a gross budgetary impact estimated to be greater than 0.25 percent of projected gross domestic product.
Rejected in Committee of the Whole 186-219: R 4-215; D 182-4; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (162) - HR 1874: CBO Macroeconomic Analysis - Business Impact 
April 04, 2014 - Jackson Lee, D-Texas, amendment that would require the Congressional Budget Office to include the potential impact on historically underutilized business zones as part of its supplemental macroeconomic impact analyses of major legislation, defined as bills that have a gross budgetary impact estimated to be greater than 0.25 percent of projected gross domestic product.
Rejected in Committee of the Whole 185-222: R 4-216; D 181-6; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (163) - HR 1874: CBO Macroeconomic Analysis - Recommit 
April 04, 2014 - Kuster, D-N.H., motion to recommit the bill to the House Budget Committee and report it back immediately with an amendment that would require the Congressional Budget Office to include in its supplemental macroeconomic impact analyses the impact federal expenditures, including spending on education, transportation and infrastructure, authorized in scored legislation, has on job creation and economic growth.
Motion rejected 187-218: R 1-218; D 186-0; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (164) - HR 1874: CBO Macroeconomic Analysis - Passage 
April 04, 2014 - Passage of the bill that would require the Congressional Budget Office to supplement its cost estimates with broad economic impact analyses for major pieces of legislation, or "dynamic scoring." The analyses would be required for bills that have a gross budgetary impact estimated to be greater than 0.25 percent of projected gross domestic product. Appropriations bills would be exempt from the measure. Under the bill, analyses would look at the impact over 40 years, broken into 10-year periods, and include expected changes in spending or revenues that would occur based on economic growth. It also would require the CBO to review the accuracy of its macroeconomic analyses, five years after the bill's enactment.
Passed 224-182: R 220-0; D 4-182; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (165) - HR 1872: Federal Credit Program Accounting - Recommit 
April 07, 2014 - DeLauro, D-Conn., motion to recommit the bill to the House Budget Committee and report it back immediately with an amendment that would prohibit the bill from taking effect until the female-to-male earnings ratio of full time, year-round workers is 1:1, as determined by the U.S. Census. It also would exempt small business, student, agriculture or veterans' housing loan program if the increased costs of loans or credit results in an elimination or reduction of federal funding for such programs.
Motion rejected 179-217: R 0-215; D 179-2; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (166) - HR 1872: Federal Credit Program Accounting - Passage 
April 07, 2014 - Passage of the bill that would require federal credit program costs to be measured using "fair value accounting," an approach that considers the broader market and economic conditions when calculating the cost of lending. The bill would provide for an increase in discretionary spending caps to account for the costs caused by this new accounting rule. It also would require that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's budgets be incorporated into the federal budget. Under the bill, federal departments and agencies would be required to prepare detailed budget justifications in their annual budget requests incorporating the accounting rules and to make the request available to the public when they are submitted to Congress.
Passed 230-165: R 214-0; D 16-165; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (167) - HR 1871: Baseline Budget Projections - Recommit 
April 08, 2014 - Bustos, D-Ill., motion to recommit the bill to the House Budget Committee and report it back immediately with an amendment that would exempt from the bill federal student loans, federal special education spending, veterans disability and education benefits and health and safety programs.
Motion rejected 191-221: R 1-221; D 190-0; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (168) - HR 1871: Baseline Budget Projections - Passage 
April 08, 2014 - Passage of the bill that would eliminate the baseline assumption in current budget law that discretionary spending increases each year by the level of inflation. It also would codify two existing Congressional Budget Office practices: displaying a 10-year window of future years in its baselines and annually publishing a long-term budget report that projects the fiscal outlook for the next 40 years. It also would eliminate special rules regarding future discretionary spending projections for expiring housing contracts, federal employee pay and social insurance administrative expenses.
Passed 230-185: R 223-0; D 7-185; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (169) - H Con Res 96: Fiscal 2015 Budget Resolution - Previous Question 
April 08, 2014 - Woodall, R-Ga., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 544) that would provide for House floor consideration of the fiscal 2015 budget resolution.
Motion agreed to 219-190: R 219-0; D 0-190; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (170) - H Con Res 96: Fiscal 2015 Budget Resolution - Rule 
April 08, 2014 - Adoption of the rule (H Res 544) that would provide for House floor consideration of the fiscal 2015 budget resolution (H Con Res 96).
Adopted 222-194: R 222-1; D 0-193; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (171) - H Con Res 96: Fiscal 2015 Budget Resolution - President's Budget Substitute 
April 09, 2014 - Mulvaney, R-S.C., substitute amendment that would provide for $3.207 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2015, not including off-budget accounts. It would replace sequestration beginning in fiscal 2016. It would call for an additional $56 billion evenly split between defense and nondefense accounts, spending on items ranging from increased access to certain preschool programs to new job training programs for Air Force fighters and Army helicopters. It also would call for the creation of a national network of 45 manufacturing institutes, a permanent research and development tax credit and a four-year $302 billion surface transportation reauthorization. It would call for these costs to be offset with a combination of revenue increases and alternative spending cuts, including by reducing federal crop insurance subsides, reallocating spectrum, boosting Transportation Security Administration passenger fees and reducing the tax benefits for multimillion-dollar retirement accounts. It would recommend setting a 30 percent minimum effective tax rate for millionaires and reductions to the value of itemized deductions and other tax preferences for the wealthiest taxpayers. It also would call for an expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit for workers without qualifying children, an extension of unemployment insurance benefits and the enactment of a comprehensive immigration overhaul.
Rejected in Committee of the Whole 2-413: R 0-224; D 2-189; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (172) - H Con Res 96: Fiscal 2015 Budget Resolution - Congressional Black Caucus Substitute 
April 09, 2014 - Moore, D-Wis., substitute amendment that would provide for $3.443 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2015, not including off-budget accounts. It would call for an additional $500 billion over the first three years for infrastructure and jobs programs, including $230 billion for infrastructure repairs; $100 billion for a national direct job creation program; $50 billion for school modernization; $50 billion to fund teacher, law enforcement and first responder jobs; $50 billion to rebuild neighborhoods; $13 billion for job training and $7 billion for summer jobs. It also would call for $388 billion increase in funding for anti-poverty programs such as the Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program and extending unemployment insurance. It also would recommend raising the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 per hour and assume repeal of the automatic spending cuts under the sequester. To pay for the spending increases, it would recommend a number of revenue increases including lowering tax deductions and eliminating tax breaks for corporations and wealthy Americans and a number of policy changes such as adding a public option to health insurance exchanges, passing comprehensive immigration overhaul and ending spending from the Defense Department's Overseas Contingency Operations account.
Rejected in Committee of the Whole 116-300: R 0-224; D 116-76; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (173) - H Con Res 96: Fiscal 2015 Budget Resolution - Congressional Progressive Caucus Substitute 
April 09, 2014 - Grijalva, D-Ariz., substitute amendment that would provide for $3.248 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2015, not including off-budget accounts. The plan would assume repeal of the automatic spending cuts under the sequester. It would call for spending increases on a wide variety of workforce initiatives, social programs and other activities, including: $100 billion for K-12 schools and teacher support; $21 billion to restore Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefit cuts; $95 billion for block grants for first responders, safety net programs and Medicaid and $116 billion for public works jobs programs to aid distressed communities. It would recommend restoring federal unemployment benefits to a 99-week maximum, at a cost of $78 billion, and would direct $138 billion to be used to permanently address the Medicare physician reimbursement rate issue known as the "doc fix." It would call for changes to the tax code to generate additional revenue, including the addition of five higher marginal tax rates for individual incomes in the tax code, capping the value of itemized deductions, repealing the step-up for capital gains at death and the elimination of the home deduction credit for vacation homes and yachts. It also would recommend the creation of a public insurance option within the health insurance exchanges and propose allowing Medicare to negotiate rates for prescription drugs and services. It would call for cuts in non-emergency Defense Department spending, the elimination of funding for Overseas Contingency Operations after fiscal 2015 and the implementation of a comprehensive immigration overhaul. It also would call for transparency in national security budgets and funding for the public financing of campaigns.
Rejected in Committee of the Whole 89-327: R 0-224; D 89-103; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (174) - HR 4414: Expatriate Health Care Plans - Passage 
April 09, 2014 - Nunes, R-Calif., motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill that would exempt expatriate health care plans from the individual and employer mandates required under the 2010 health care law. The bill would define expatriate health care plans as a group health care plans, offered to workers outside their home country, that offer "substantially all" of the same benefits required under the 2010 health care law and in which "substantially all" enrollees are expatriates.
Motion rejected 257-159: R 205-20; D 52-139; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (175) - H Con Res 96: Fiscal 2015 Budget Resolution - Republican Study Committee Substitute 
April 10, 2014 - Woodall, R-Ga., substitute amendment that would provide for $2.744 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2015, not including off-budget accounts. The plan would call for repeal of the 2010 health care overhaul. It would propose converting several social programs including Medicaid and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program into block grants to be funded at fiscal 2014 levels. The plan would call for eliminating the mandatory increase in funding for the Pell Grant program, the subsidized interest payments on federal undergraduate student loans and the social services block grant. It would propose requiring federal employees to contribute more to both their pensions and health benefits and reducing the federal workforce through attrition. The substitute would propose reducing premium subsidies for crop insurance from 60 percent to 40 percent. It also would call for a revenue neutral tax code overhaul that would create two income tax rates, with a top rate of 25 percent. It also would call for repeal of the inheritance tax, propose setting the dividend tax rate at a maximum of 15 percent and provide for equal tax treatment for individual and employer health care expenditures.
Rejected in Committee of the Whole 133-291: R 133-97; D 0-194; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


(176) - H Con Res 96: Fiscal 2015 Budget Resolution - Democratic Substitute 
April 10, 2014 - Van Hollen, D-Md., substitute amendment that would provide for $3.078 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2015, not including off-budget accounts. The plan would call for repealing the sequester, including cuts to Medicare. It also would propose eliminating the non-defense discretionary sequester starting in 2016. The substitute would assume an increase of the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour and enactment of the Senate-passed immigration overhaul. It would propose extending expired unemployment benefits for one year and extending the tax credits from the 2012 extension of Bush-era income and other tax cuts due to expire at the end of 2017. It would assume implementation of the 2010 health care overhaul and assume increases in physician fees for primary care services under Medicaid. It would accommodate deficit-neutral legislation to permanently address the Medicare physician reimbursement rate issue known as the "doc fix." The plan would propose expanding tax incentives aimed at encouraging low- and middle-income taxpayers to attend college and save for retirement. It would call on Congress to raise revenue by ending tax breaks for special interests and the very wealthy.
Rejected in Committee of the Whole 163-261: R 0-230; D 163-31; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (177) - H Con Res 96: Fiscal 2015 Budget Resolution - Adoption 
April 10, 2014 - Adoption of the concurrent resolution that would provide for $2.842 trillion in new budget authority in fiscal 2015, not including off-budget accounts. It would assume $5.1 trillion in reductions over the next 10 years in both discretionary and mandatory spending. The proposal would assume the repeal of the 2010 health care overhaul. It also would propose extending the 2013 law that withheld the pay of members of Congress unless the House and Senate each approve a budget resolution. It would propose changing the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program into a block grant program and call for a decrease of $125 billion in SNAP funding over five years. The proposal would call for expanded work and job training requirements in order to receive aid from the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families Program and would propose preventing beneficiaries from receiving unemployment insurance and disability insurance concurrently. It would call for the creation of a block grant program for Medicaid run by individual states. It also would include a proposal for a 10-year "doc fix" to prevent a 24 percent cut in Medicare payments to doctors. It would assume the enactment of legislation to consolidate the current seven individual tax brackets into two, allowing for the reduction of the top individual rate from 39.6 percent to 25 percent and the corporate rate from 35 percent to 25 percent and call for repeal of the alternative minimum tax. It also would call for a maximum-income cap to qualify for Pell Grants and the elimination of eligibility for less than half-time students.
Adopted 219-205: R 219-12; D 0-193; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (178) - HR 4192: D.C. Building Height - Passage 
April 28, 2014 - Issa, R-Calif., motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill that would allow for human occupancy on penthouse floors in the District of Columbia currently reserved only for mechanical structures. The bill would cap the height of these penthouses to one story, which could be no more than 20 feet high.
Motion agreed to 367-16: R 197-15; D 170-1; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (179) - HR 4120: National Law Enforcement Museum Construction - Passage 
April 28, 2014 - Hoyer, D-Md., motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill that would extend for three years, until Nov. 9, 2016, the authority of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund to construct a museum honoring law enforcement officers.
Motion agreed to 384-0: R 211-0; D 173-0; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (180) - HR 4414: Expatriate Health Care Plans - Previous Question 
April 29, 2014 - Burgess, R-Texas, motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and the possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 555) that would provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would exempt expatriate health care plans from the individual and employer mandates required under the 2010 health care law.
Motion agreed to 226-189: R 224-0; D 2-189; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


(181) - HR 4414: Expatriate Health Care Plans - Rule 
April 29, 2014 - Adoption of the rule (H Res 555) that would provide for House floor consideration of a bill (HR4414) that would exempt expatriate health care plans from the individual and employer mandates required under the 2010 health care law.
Adopted 238-181: R 226-0; D 12-181; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (182) - HR 4414: Expatriate Health Care Plans - Passage 
April 29, 2014 - Passage of the bill that would exempt expatriate health care plans from the individual and employer mandates required under the 2010 health care law. The bill would define such plans as group health care plans, offered to workers outside their home country, that offer "substantially all" of the same benefits required under the 2010 health care law and in which "substantially all" enrollees are expatriates. To qualify for these plans, expatriates would have to have been abroad for at least six months in connection with his or her employment. Students or religious missionaries who are abroad would also be considered expatriates as well as any member of a group determined appropriate by the Health and Human Services secretary.
Passed 268-150: R 208-17; D 60-133; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (183) - HR 627: National Parks Coins - Passage 
April 29, 2014 - Garrett, R-N.J., motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill that would authorize the Treasury Department to mint and issue various coins commemorating the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service in 2016.
Motion agreed to 403-13: R 211-13; D 192-0; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (184) - HR 4487, HR4486: Fiscal 2015 Military Construction and Legislative Branch Appropriations - Previous Question 
April 30, 2014 - Cole, R-Okla., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and the possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 557) that would provide for House floor consideration of the bill (HR 4487) that would fund the legislative branch for fiscal 2015 at current enacted levels and a Military Construction-VA spending bill (HR 4486) that would provide $165 billion in fiscal 2015 funding.
Motion agreed to 227-189: R 227-0; D 0-189; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea


 (185) - HR 4486: Fiscal 2015 Military Construction-VA Appropriations - Guantanamo Bay Detainees 
April 30, 2014 - Moran, D-Va., amendment that would strike language that would prohibit funds from being used to house any prisoner from Guantanamo Bay at a facility in the United States.
Rejected in Committee of the Whole 168-249: R 4-221; D 164-28; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (186) - HR 4486: Fiscal 2015 Military Construction-VA Appropriations - Medical Marijuana 
April 30, 2014 - Blumenauer, D-Ore., amendment that would prohibit funds from being used to implement a Veterans Health Administration directive that prohibits VA medical providers from completing forms seeking recommendations or opinions regarding a veteran's participation in a state marijuana program.
Rejected in Committee of the Whole 195-222: R 22-204; D 173-18; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Nay


 (187) - HR 4486: Fiscal 2015 Military Construction-VA Appropriations - Passage 
April 30, 2014 - Passage of the bill that would provide $165 billion in fiscal 2015 for the Veterans Affairs Department, military construction and military housing. It would provide $71.5 billion in discretionary funds, including $59.6 billion for veterans' health programs. The bill would provide $74.6 billion in mandatory spending for veterans' service-connected compensation, benefits and pensions. The total funding also includes $6.6 billion for military construction, including $1.2 billion for military family housing. The bill would provide $58.7 billion in advance appropriations for certain VA medical care accounts for fiscal 2016.
Passed 416-1: R 225-1; D 191-0; I 0-0.

 

Vote: Yea

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